Our “Blandus Daemon” Our Flattering Enemy

Leah

Those that want the honors of the world, want the temptations of it.

The world is “Blandus Daemon,” a flattering enemy. It is given to some as Michal to David, for a snare.

The world shews its two breasts of pleasure and profit, and many fall asleep with these breasts in their mouth. The world never kisses us, but with an intent to betray us. It is a silken halter.

The world is no friend to grace; it chokes our love to heavenly things: the earth puts out the spiritual fire. Naturally we love the world, Job 31: 24. ‘If I have made gold my hope;’ the Septuagint renders it, ‘If I have been married to my gold.’ Too many are wedded to their money; they live together as man and wife. O let us take heed of being entangled in this pleasing snare.

Many who have escaped the rock of scandalous sins, yet have sunk in the world’s golden quicksand. The sin is not in the using of the world, but in the loving, 1 John 2: 15. ‘Love not the world.’ If we are Christians, we must offer violence to the world. Believers are ‘called out of the world:’ they are in the world, but not of it, John 17.

As we say of a dying man, he is not a man for this world. A true saint is crucified in his affections to the world, Gal. 6: 14. He is dead to the honors and pleasures of it. What delight does a dead man take in pictures or music? Jesus Christ gave himself ‘to redeem us from this present evil world,’ Gal. 1:4. If we will be saved, we must offer violence to the world.

Living fish swim against the stream. We must swim against the world, else we shall be carried down the stream, and fall into the Dead Sea. That we may offer violence to the world, let us remember, it is deceitful; our Savior calls it, ‘The deceitfulness of riches,’ Matt.13:22.

The world promises happiness. It promises us nothing less than Rachel, but puts off on us blear-eyed Leah:’ it promises to satisfy our desires, but instead increases them: it gives us poisoned pills, but it always wraps them in sugar.

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Taken and adapted from, “The Christian Soldier,”
Written by Thomas Watson, 1669.