Just a Bit O’ History… Psalm 67: A Prayer for Blessing and Thanksgiving

Psalm 67

prayerThksgThis psalm has been called by the ancient expositors ‘the Lord’s Prayer of the Old Testament.’

It has, like that of the New, seven divisions. The first three verses and last three are linked by a longer one in the middle, and the third and fifth are in the same words. It is by special distinction the missionary psalm.

In the year 1644, the Corporation (or City) of London invited the two Houses of Parliament to a grand banquet, in proof of the union of their cause, and in celebration of their victory. The Westminster Assembly of Divines and the Scottish Commissioners were also invited, and the festival was after the manner of that of Solomon at the dedication of the temple.

Stephen Marshall, a noted preacher of the day, selected for his text the appropriate words, 1 Chron. 12:38-40; and the spiritual provision seems to have reached a lavish expenditure not thought of in public feasts in our days.

Baillie gives a full description of the rejoicings, and tells how the feast ended with the singing of the 67th Psalm, Dr. Burgess reading the line, that all might take part, ‘a religious precedent,’ says a chronicler of the time, ‘worthy to be imitated by all godly Christians in both their public and private meetings.’

 

Psalm 67

1599 Geneva Bible

To him that excelleth on Neginoth. A Psalm or song.

God be merciful unto us, and bless us, and cause his face to shine among us. Selah
That they may know thy way upon earth, and thy saving health among all nations.
Let the people praise thee, O God: let all the people praise thee.
Let the people be glad and rejoice: for thou shalt judge the people righteously,
and govern the nations upon the earth.
Selah.

Let the people praise thee, O God: let all the people praise thee.
Then shall the earth bring forth her increase, and God, even our God shall bless us.
God shall bless us, and all the ends of the earth shall fear him.

——————————————-
Written by John Ker, D. D.
Taken from, “The Psalms in History and Biography”
Edited for thought and sense.